Posts Tagged ‘Belgian’

Cell Phone Tasting Notes

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

I finally found a use for that notes function on my cell phone. Turns out it works much better then writing beer reviews on bar napkins.

Recently I tried Ommegang Adoration. I was directed towards this beer by Jack. Apparently Nick Lopez, the new man behind Venti’s Bar, decided to stock this one off beer. Venti’s is charging $15 a bottle for it, so I kinda wish I had a friend with me to share the bottle, and the tab. I had Hooper rinse out the snifter that my Old Crustacean was poured in and used that for tasting. After trying it I can’t see why this Beer only has a B+ on Beeradvocate. So much for Jeff defending them. I know people have different tastes, but this beer should have preformed much better then it did.

Aroma

I always do aroma first so I can catch the scents stirred up from the pour, I always sniff the bottle opening too. Aroma is plum, very spicy. Smells very malty. Fairly complex blend of aromas. Some orange peel as well.

Appearance

Mahogany color. Large off white head, very effervescent. Needs to be poured slowly. Big bubbles. More of a pillowy head

Flavor

Orange peel hit first followed by dark fruits, spices, and some tartness. Definitely get a little funk. Possibly Brett? Wouldn’t surprise me. Maltier then I thought it would be. Definite dark malts. The spices might be a little much, but I like their strong presence.

Overall

Great beer. Complex with alot going on, but neither too much that it muddies it, or any flavor so strong it drowns the others. I know this goes contrary to my comment about the spices strong presence, but I think it compliments the beer rather then subjugate it. Out of all the Belgian Winter Ales I’ve tried this winter this one takes first.

Bottom Of The Belgian

Wednesday, December 30th, 2009

Butts

There are some beers that are supposed to be crystal clear with low yeast flavors, and there are others that should be be loaded with some strong funky yeast esthers. The problem is though that many great beers are bottled in 22oz bombers and the slightly larger 750ml bottles. While writing my review of Long strange tripel I was reminded of this problem. One of my complaints was not enough yeast flavor. By the time I hit the bottom of the bottle where the yeast was in suspension though the beer was fairly opaque and funky. The problem with this is that the first drink lacked a strong yeast flavor, and the last to much.

Therefor I hereby submit that contrary to the American fad of 22oz bombers, good beer should be bottled in 12oz bottles. This allows the drinker to swirl the yeast back into suspension before drinking if they choose, and also allows the drinker to taste multiple bottles in a single session. Another side effect of good beer being bottled in 12oz would be that a beer like a imperial stout or Belgian saison could easily be consumed during a lunch break without a worry. Sadly though more and more breweries are releasing their unique beers in only 750ml and 22oz. Can anyone explain why breweries do this??? It makes absolutley no sense to me other then a marketing standpoint.